4 Researchers

Tech4POD team members in front of a display at the GCMAS meeting

Our combined research focuses on developing new tools, better technologies, and improved treatment strategies for children with cerebral palsy, clubfoot, spina bifida, spinal cord injuries, osteogenesis imperfecta (brittle bone disease) and other orthopaedic conditions.

Training and dissemination are vital components of this project. Activities include online training, distribution of publications, educational courses, conference workshops, symposia and presentations, newsletters, accessible registries, and state-of-the-art information for clinicians, parents, participants, other health care professionals and researchers.

 
 

4 Patients & Parents

Image of a teddy bear running
A smiling child in a motorized wheelchair

Tech4POD consists of a group of doctors, researchers and health care professionals dedicated to improving the quality of life for children with orthopaedic disabilities.  This section of our website describes the studies and new tools that are being developed to improve the treatment of children with cerebral palsy, clubfoot, spina bifida, spinal cord injury, brittle bone disease and other orthopaedic conditions.

 
 

4 Practitioners

Dr. Harris with a patient using a lower leg device.
Photograph of a young boy and his doctor flexing their biceps.

The combined research activities of Tech4POD focus on developing new tools, better technologies, and improved treatment strategies for children with cerebral palsy, clubfoot, spina bifida, spinal cord injuries, osteogenesis imperfecta and other orthopaedic and musculoskeletal conditions. The four research and four development projects offer a variety of technical approaches to improve our knowledge and ability to care for children with orthopaedic disabilities. Wide ranging areas of investigation range from tissue level research to robotic assisted therapy and advanced mobility modeling. Sister development projects seek to develop novel technologies that can easily migrate to users and practitioners in the field of rehabilitation.

 
 

Funding for this work has been provided by the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR), U.S. Department of Education, under grant H133E100007. However, the contents of this site do not necessarily represent the policy of the Department of Education, and you should not assume endorsement by the Federal Government.